RESEARCH PAPER
Adult male involvement in maternity care in Enugu State, Nigeria: A cross-sectional study
 
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1
Department of Nursing Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technology, University of Nigeria, Enugu, Nigeria
2
National Orthopaedic Hospital, Enugu Nigeria
3
Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Chisom J. Mbadugha   

Department of Nursing Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technology, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, Enugu State, Nigeria
Publish date: 2019-09-23
Submission date: 2019-03-04
Final revision date: 2019-07-02
Acceptance date: 2019-09-10
 
Eur J Midwifery 2019;3(September):16
KEYWORDS
TOPICS
ABSTRACT
Introduction:
Men are the key decision makers in the family and play a crucial role in the reproductive health of partners, in Nigeria. This study assessed adult male involvement in maternity care in Enugu south local government area, Enugu State, Nigeria.

Methods:
This community-based study was conducted using a cross-sectional survey design. A total of 145 respondents were selected through multi-stage sampling and data were collected using a structured questionnaire developed by the researchers. Data generated were statistically analyzed based on the research objectives using descriptive statistics.

Results:
Major findings revealed that the respondents had moderate knowledge on the expected role of males in maternity care with the majority, assessed using a 4-point Likert scale, having a moderate (2.99) level of involvement in maternity care. Lack of facilities that encourage male participation in maternity care, work schedule of the male partner, and lack of knowledge on the role of the male partners during maternity care were identified as major barriers to male involvement in maternity care with means of 3.80, 3.58 and 3.48, respectively.

Conclusions:
Involvement in maternity care among the respondents in this study was moderate. However, men may be restricted by some cultural beliefs such as maternity care being regarded as exclusively a woman’s matter. Thus, men should be educated on the importance of their role as partners in maternity care and on the need to participate actively, regardless of existing cultural norms. Hospitals should also promote policies that encourage male presence during birth and delivery rooms need to be designed to allow bonding of partners during birth.

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST
The authors have completed and submitted the ICMJE Form for Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest and none was reported.
FUNDING
There was no source of funding for this research.
PROVENANCE AND PEER REVIEW
Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.
 
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