RESEARCH PAPER
Factors associated with malnutrition among pregnant women and lactating mothers in Miesso Health Center, Ethiopia
 
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1
Department of Midwifery, Harar Health Science College, Harar, Ethiopia
2
Department of Nursing, Haramaya University, Harar, Ethiopia
3
Miesso Health Center, Oromia Region, Ethiopia
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Masresha Leta Serbesa   

Department of Midwifery, Harar Health Science College, Harar, Ethiopia
Publish date: 2019-07-22
Submission date: 2019-01-24
Final revision date: 2019-06-19
Acceptance date: 2019-06-19
 
Eur J Midwifery 2019;3(July):13
KEYWORDS
TOPICS
ABSTRACT
Introduction:
Malnutrition is one of the major problems in which the physical function of an individual is impaired to the point that it can no longer maintain adequate body processes such as growth, physical work, and resistance to or recovery from disease. Malnutrition is associated with a low economic situation, and poor personal and environmental hygiene. Recent studies found that the centre of the problem is the backward socioeconomic development of the country. The level of the healthcare services in Ethiopia is low, even when compared to sub-Sahara African countries. The objective of this study was to assess the magnitude of malnutrition and associated factors among pregnant women and lactating mothers in the Miesso Health Centre, Miesso Woreda, Oromia Region, Ethiopia.

Methods:
A cross-sectional study was conducted from 1 February to 30 May 2017, among pregnant women and lactating mothers in Miesso Woreda. A sample of 304 women was selected using a systematic random sampling approach from the list of patients, with different sociodemographic status.

Results:
Our results showed that among all pregnant women and lactating mothers, 12.6% were overweight and 30.3% were underweight. From multiple logistic regression analysis, family incomes (AOR=2.056, 95% CI: 1.051–4.023) and age of women (AOR=2.169, 95% CI: 1.015–4.634) were significantly associated with the nutritional status of the study participants.

Conclusions:
We recommend that authorities should: facilitate the rural-urban community’s access to information on nutrition including eating-practices sanitation; initiate a health and development program during pregnancy and lactation; expand women’s education on diet during pregnancy and lactation.

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST
The authors have completed and submitted the ICMJE Form for Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest and none was reported.
FUNDING
There was no source of funding for this research.
PROVENANCE AND PEER REVIEW
Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.
 
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