LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Caesarean section epidemic: Tackling the rise of unnecessary cuts
Renata Josi 1  
 
 
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University of Applied Sciences and Arts of Southern Switzerland (SUPSI), Department of Business Economics, Health and Social Care, Manno, Switzerland
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Renata Josi   

University of Applied Sciences and Arts of Southern Switzerland (SUPSI), Department of Business Economics, Health and Social Care, Manno, Switzerland
Publish date: 2019-03-26
Submission date: 2018-11-29
Final revision date: 2019-03-21
Acceptance date: 2019-03-22
 
Eur J Midwifery 2019;3(March):6
KEYWORDS
TOPICS
CONFLICTS OF INTEREST
The author has completed and submitted the ICMJE Form for Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest and none was reported.
FUNDING
There was no source of funding for this research.
PROVENANCE AND PEER REVIEW
Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.
 
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World Health Organisation. Non-clinical interventions to reduce unnecessary caesarean sections 2018. http://apps.who.int/iris/bitst.... Accessed November 15, 2018.
 
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Boerma T, Ronsmans C, Melesse DY, et al. Global epidemiology of use of and disparities in caesarean sections. The Lancet. 2018;392(10155):1341–1348. doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(18)31928-7
 
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Boatin AA, Schlotheuber A, Betran AP, et al. Within country inequalities in caesarean section rates: observational study of 72 low and middle income countries. BMJ. 2018;360:k55. doi:10.1136/bmj.k55
 
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Mendoza-Sassi RA, Cesar JA, Silva PR da, Denardin G, Rodrigues MM. Risk factors for cesarean section by category of health service. Rev Saúde Pública. 2010;44(1):80–89. doi:10.1590/s0034-89102010000100009
 
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Betrán AP, Temmerman M, Kingdon C, et al. Interventions to reduce unnecessary caesarean sections in healthy women and babies. The Lancet. 2018;392(10155):1358–1368. doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(18)31927-5
 
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Sandall J, Soltani H, Gates S, Shennan A, Devane D. Midwife‐led continuity models versus other models of care for childbearing women. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2013;Issue 8. Art. No.: CD004667. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004667.pub3
 
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Offerhaus PM, de Jonge A, van der Pal–de Bruin KM, Hukkelhoven CWPM, Scheepers PLH, Lagro-Janssen ALM. Change in primary midwife-led care in the Netherlands in 2000–2008: A descriptive study of caesarean sections and other interventions among 789,795 low risk births. Midwifery. 2014;30(5):560–566. doi:10.1016/j.midw.2013.06.013
 
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